Tag Archives: default

Android ART displaces Dalvik as default runtime in code commit

[#protected_0#]

While it may still be a long time coming, a recent commit to the Android source code has just switched the default Android runtime from Dalvik to ART. [#protected_0#] has not yet commented on what it expects developers to do to adjust, but the this pretty much makes it clear the company’s direction moving forward.

As the default runtime, Dalvik is critical to the whole Android operating system. It is the Java-based virtual machine on which each and every single Android app runs. Accordingly, it has been the center of litigation that strike at the very heart of Android’s existence, particularly the lawsuit brought by Oracle against Google.

Considering the important role Dalvik plays in Android, it was almost shocking that Google would even consider yanking out. But dare they did and in Android 4.4 introduced a new runtime, simply called ART for Android Runtime. The reason was that, while things were good, it could be even better. Dalvik was already designed to be lightweight and fast. After all, every Android app runs sandboxed in its own Dalvik virtual machine copy. But there was still room for improvement. Dalvik implemented what is called “Just In Time” compilation, which translates and runs the software into machine language each and every time the software is run. Compare that to ART’s Ahead Of Time compilation, which does that compilation process just once during installation, and you a significant amount of time and resources.

That said, Google has clearly marked ART as experimental even when it shipped both Dalvik and ARM in Android 4.4. Dalvik was clearly the default but now it seems that Google is paving the way for the transition. It is still unknown when Google will announce the next major Android version bearing ART as default, but now that the switch has been flipped, it may be a good time for developers to test the waters and fix and report issues that they may encounter.

VIA: Liliputing

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AOSP commit hints that ART could become default in next Android release

Android 4.4 KitKat

A new commit in AOSP indicates that the Android runtime (ART) could become default in the next version of Android.

When Android 4.4 KitKat was first announced there were quite a few new features brought to the table including a redesigned dialer, improved Google Now integration and the list goes on. KitKat also brought us our first taste of ART, a hidden Android runtime that could easily be enabled via Developer options.

When ART first surfaced, it was noted that it performed faster than the existing Dalvik, but there were also noted compatibility issues with some apps. While some of these issues still exist, many app developers have since updated their apps to better work with the currently optional run-time. Still, ART isn’t quite ready for primetime — or is it? A new commit to the Android Open Source Project hints that ART may be made default with the next version of Android.

The change is basically just a minor revision in the code that sets ART to default, and leaves Dalvik as an option that you can fall back to in the event something goes wrong. At the moment, this change is live in the master branch, but it’s important to note that doesn’t necessarily mean we’ll see it pushed out with the next version of Android. Code changes happen often throughout the development process, and the developers could simply have added the change for testing purposes. Bottom-line, take the possibility with a grain of salt.

What do you think of ART so far? Do you think it’s ready to replace Dalvik by default or is Google better off waiting a bit longer?


    








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Moto X system dump and default wallpapers are now available

Moto X

The covers have been finally taken off the Moto X, and a massive system dump from this device has been posted online! It`s 442MB in size, and contains some really cool wallpapers, among other software features. You can grab the 7MB .zip file of 16 wallpapers here, or you can find the entire system dump over at the Android Central forums. What do you think of the Moto X so far? Are you impressed? Disappointed? Not sure what you think? Let us know on the comments!

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Weird iPhone habits: open slots, default layouts, and ringer switches, oh my…

 Weird iPhone habits: open slots, default layouts, and ringer switches, oh my...

Smartphones and other mobile technology are very personal devices. Not just that they’re something that we have on us all the time, but they’re devices that we customize to suit exactly our needs and our needs alone. We get used to how they’re set up, and if we’re handed somebody else’s iPhone, well, we’re lost. Just try dealing with somebody who has different Smart Corner settings on their Mac than you – it’s maddening.

In customizing the set-ups for our devices we also customize our interactions with them. We develop weird habits and tendencies. Some of us are compulsive about the placement of icons in the launcher, others only want specific things in Notification Center. Sometimes it’s about where we put the phone, and sometimes we just don’t give a damn about some things that drive others insane.

Upon realizing that I do some weird and obsessive things with my iPhone, I asked the iMore editorial staff what weird things they do, and it turns out, we’re weird. But you already knew that.

Keeping a slot open for… – Allyson Kazmucha

 Weird iPhone habits: open slots, default layouts, and ringer switches, oh my...

My main screen on my iPhone and iPad are my most used apps. If I don’t use them on a regular basis, they’re all put into folders and not allowed to run amuck causing chaos. I don’t alphabetize things but they all have to be in correct folders under a descriptive category. My iPhone and iPad also have the same workflow so no matter what device I’m on, I know where to find things.

I’m super picky about Notification Center and what order notifications show up in. Things like email, messages, and Twitter must populate towards the top with lesser important things on the bottom.

My biggest nitpick is ugly icons. If an app has an ugly icon, it goes in a folder, no exceptions. My Home screen must be visually appealing at all times and an ugly icon will throw off that balance. Album art must also be present for everything in my music library or it makes me twitch in cover flow mode. I will literally delete a song from my iPhone if there is no album art.

My weirdest quirk is probably that I need to have at least one empty slot on my first Home screen. I’m not quite sure why but I’ve done this as long as I can remember. I don’t know why it bothers me to have a full page of icons but it does and I must have one free slot on my main page or I feel dirty. Call me weird, I already know I am and I accept it.

Default all the things – Chris Parsons

 Weird iPhone habits: open slots, default layouts, and ringer switches, oh my...

I have to have my main home screen stock. I do it on all devices except for Android, because Android such a cluster f*** of ugly icons some of it has to be hidden.

Triple-teaming the ringer switch – Derek Kessler

 Weird iPhone habits: open slots, default layouts, and ringer switches, oh my...

I know the ringer switch vibrates when I switch it to silent and doesn’t when I flip it to noise. But when switching from silent to ring without looking at the screen, I always have to flip it three times: ring, silent (so it buzzes), and back to ring. Sometimes I do the same thing when switching to silent: silent (buzz), ring, silent (buzz). I don’t know why, but it’s like I subconsciously don’t trust the switch.

I’m a little psychotic about my app organization. The first page is home to the apps I use the most, and those are alphabetically arranged (excepting the dock). The next page is also alphabetically arranged, with my tier of second-most-used apps but not daily or need-quickly apps out and everything else is put into folders which are… alphabetically-arranged and separated. The only exception are my games, which are put into their own folder, yet still alphabetical inside. Reason being: I’m usually looking for a specific app (except for games), not a category of apps, and muscle memory can guide me. And organization, man.

Updates… what updates? – Georgia

 Weird iPhone habits: open slots, default layouts, and ringer switches, oh my...

The strangest thing about myself and my iPhone is that I rarely let it be far from my side.

So if I have to go somewhere and my outfit has no pockets ill place my phone in the inside of my pant belt so I can keep my previous close at hand.

My phone is also always on silent with no vibration on. So calling me rarely gets a immediate pick up. I started this due to my job as a therapist but then quickly realized that I am more relaxed when I am not hopping for my phone.

I also don’t ever update my phones applications unless there is something I really want in the update. Strange part is that I never read what the update so I find things out by people telling me something cool has changed. At one point I had 150 plus updates on my phone.

And no I don’t wear my iPhone as a hat, that rumor was a lie.

Weirdos all of you – Leanna Lofte

 Weird iPhone habits: open slots, default layouts, and ringer switches, oh my...

Um… I don’t do anything weird with my iPhone that I know of. I don’t organize my apps… my home screen isn’t even that thought out. I could care less how my apps are organized because I just use Spotlight. Spotlight is way faster.

You’re all a bunch of freaks.

That like-new look – Peter Cohen

 Weird iPhone habits: open slots, default layouts, and ringer switches, oh my...

I like to leave the home screen bone stock.

I pile it full of apps on the second page and beyond, but I want my home screen to look like it did when it came out of the box.

Captain Default – Rene Ritchie

 Weird iPhone habits: open slots, default layouts, and ringer switches, oh my...

I keep my iPhone Home screen stock. What Apple loads, I keep. That’s because I switch devices and restore devices a lot. I do add a few apps to the empty spaces, namely Fantastical, the iMore app, and Tweetbot. If I haven’t switched or restored in a while, I’ll add Launch Center Pro to my dock, because, awesome.

So I may not be Captain Default exactly, but I’m not Mr. Excitement by any means either.

Line it up – Richard Devine

 Weird iPhone habits: open slots, default layouts, and ringer switches, oh my...

I’m absolutely no tidy freak, far from it. Just take a look in my office any given day of the week and you’ll see that. But, for whatever reason I am totally OCD about where stuff sits on my desk, especially my iPhone. It has to be in one of the corners, and it has to sit absolutely in line with both straight edges of the desk.

I also put it on something, like a magazine, or some random paper. Because I don’t keep it in a case at home — cases aren’t nice in hero shots — and I absolutely hate the idea of any thing on the desk damaging or just making dirty the back of my phone.

How weird are you?

There you go, we’ve bared our weirdness to the world, and, well… what weird people we are. It takes some self awareness to realize these oddities, and if there’s anything we should be as technology users, it’s aware of how we use that tech.

We’re all weird, but in our own unique ways. Except for the Captain Default crowd out there, you’re just weird together. What weird iPhone habits and compulsions have you picked up over the years? Sound off in the coments.

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How to change the default font in the Notes app for iPhone and iPad

0a2edad24fe hero1.jpg1 How to change the default font in the Notes app for iPhone and iPad

iOS has always come with a built-in Notes app and serves as a pretty easy way to keep basic notes. While some users may prefer something more powerful like Evernote, the Notes app gets the job done for a lot of people, especially since it supports iCloud sync.

If the default font within the Notes app burns your retinas nearly as it does mine, it may deter you from using the Notes app. There’s actually a way to change it.

  1. Launch the Settings app from the Home screen of your iPhone or iPad.
  2. Scroll down and tap on Notes.
  3. Here you can switch between three options; the default Noteworthy font, Marker Felt, and Helvetica. Make your selection and then exit.

3d70eff47dhowto1.jpg1 How to change the default font in the Notes app for iPhone and iPad

While Helvetica may be the only acceptable option at this time, it will be a lot easier on the eyes than the default font.

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Chrome finally beats the default Android browser in benchmarks

Chrome

Google released the latest update to Chrome for Android yesterday, with one of the main improvements over the previous version being the updated V8 JavaScript engine. According to Google, the new Chrome 25.0.1364.123 should be noticeably faster than v.24, with a touted average speed improvement of 25% in Google’s own Octane benchmark.

The inquisitive spirits at Ars Technica have decided to see if the new Chrome is as fast as Google claims. The simplest way to do that was to run the same benchmarks on the same device on the two versions of Chrome.

First, the Ars team used a Galaxy S3 running Samsung’s Android implementation and three browsers – the old version of Chrome, the new version of Chrome, and the stock Android browser. The browsers were tested with three web benchmarks, SunSpider 0.9.1, Kraken 1.1, and Octane v1.

The second setup comprised of a Nexus 7 running stock Android 4.2.2 and the same benchmarks. This time, only the two versions of Chrome were tested, because Google ships Chrome as the default browser on Android 4.2.

Chrome-for-Android-25.003

The results were consistent across the benchmarks – the new Chrome for Android 25 is much faster than the previous version, and also beats the Android browser. While Ars Technica wasn’t able to replicate the 25% score improvement that Google announced, the results were good enough to give Google a passing score.

Along with the speed improvements, the latest version of Chrome for Android comes with support for new HTML5 features, optimizations of the scroll and swipe behavior, and bug fixes. Try it now or update your existing version from Google Play.

Head over to the link source for the full rundown.

The post Chrome finally beats the default Android browser in benchmarks appeared first on Android Authority.

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