Tag Archives: hardware

Nike rumored to be axing Fuelband hardware division

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Ouya Everywhere – use your hardware, play their games

ouya-black-16

Android videogame platform maker, Ouya, is looking at launching their service on devices other than their dedicated gaming console. Ouya Everywhere could be available soon, as Ouya may be announcing their first deal by the end of the month.

The folks over at Engadget have it on good authority that Ouya is planning to make their software and gaming services extend to other devices. There are not many details at this point, but our set-top boxes and smart TVs should be the first ones to get access. This should be no cause for alarm for those that look forward to Ouya’s annual hardware refresh cycle. Your next console should be available right on schedule.

Ouya was extremely popular before users even had the unit in hand, breaking early Kickstarter records for pledged support. Some major videogame makers also joined in, promising to make titles that would operate on the Android powered unit. The console did not fail to deliver and users enjoyed their first Android games on the big screen with a controller in hand.

Some consider the platform to have stalled in the last year, which can be validated by the relatively small number of games available for the console. On the other hand, the 682+ games available are some of the best Android games available. If Ouya opens their platform to other devices, we expect that this should rekindle the gaming fire and entice more developers to make their games available.

Are you an Ouya owner, what device would you most like to use to access your Ouya account?


    








Android Authority

HTC All New One leaked video gives a hardware and software tour

This close to the expected reveal date, we’re getting a another unofficial look at the All New One, HTC‘s successor to the One. This video highlights, among other things, a microSD slot and an all new Blinkfeed.

The hardware design pretty much follows that of previous leaked photos, with a second camera near the top edge, dual LED flash, and two front-facing speakers. On the front side, you also have the sensors moved to the right side beside the camera. At the end of the day, however, the All New One looks like the same old One, except a bit larger and, if the rumors are true, would come with other color options right off the bat.

Going to the user interface part, the HTC One successor comes with HTC Sense 6, also the latest version of HTC’s custom UI. With it comes a revamped Blinkfeed that shows up from the left side as an additional homescreeen instead of a total homescreen replacement, somewhat similar to how Samsung implemented the My Magazine feature on the Galaxy Note 3. Noted in the video are the on-screen navigation buttons that replace the capacitive buttons found on the HTC One. Strangely, Beats Music app is still on the device even though HTC and Beats already severed their times some time back.

HTC scheduled a press event later this month and they will be expected to officially announce this smartphone. We will then see if the All New One will be as good as HTC is hyping it to be.

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CrackBerry Asks: Could the BlackBerry Q20 tempt you back to a hardware keyboard?

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With us know knowing that the next BlackBerry 10 hardware keyboard flagship device (the Q20/BlackBerry Classic) will see the return of the trackpad and function keys I was intrigued to discover if the news could indeed bring ‘all touch’ BlackBerry users back to their roots and switching over to a hardware keyboard. 

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Pebble is planning to bring us ‘something special’ at CES, possibly new hardware

Pebble hits Best Buy shelves

The year 2013 might have been the year that wearable computing really started to become a buzzword, but there’s still no denying that smartwatches, computerized headsets and other wearable gizmos are very much in their early stages.

Could 2014 be the year that the wearable market truly kicks into high gear? It’s certainly starting to look that way. Not only is Google getting ever-closer to pushing out Glass to a wider audience, we’ve also heard all kinds of reports suggesting that early 2014 will see various wearable announcements from Archos, Samsung, Sony and even LG.

Let’s not forget Pebble, though. Although Pebble obviously didn’t start the smartwatch revolution, its Kickstarter campaign in the later part of 2012 certainly helped bring further attention to the wearable market. And now it looks like the smartwatch company is getting ready to wow us again at CES.

Taking to its official blog, Pebble has now revealed that they have “something special” to show us at CES, and have even announced that they will be live-streaming their press conference on January 6th (Monday) at 11pm PST for all those interested in seeing what Pebble plans to bring to the table.

So what exactly does Pebble have in store for us? Officially we have no clue, but we can speculate a little. Considering the company has already announced an app store and the original Pebble is already almost a year old, some kind of new hardware makes sense. Then again, we really don’t know for sure, but luckily we don’t have long to wait.

What do you think, would you be interested in a second-generation Pebble, or are you more interested to see what kind of wearables LG, Samsung and Sony have up their sleeves?

Android Authority

A year in review: Android Hardware in 2013

In 2013, we saw a wider variety of devices than in recent years. Not only did we see the continued spec race heat up as we got our first taste of Snapdragon processors from Qualcomm, but we saw some OEMs wisely pare their efforts back a bit. HTC went with one One, and Motorola took their time bringing new devices to market. Whether it was flagship spec-heavy offerings or a shockingly slimmed-down device, we had a lot of great stuff in 2013.

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With 2013 closed out, and credit card bills from the holidays staring us in the face, we thought it was a good time to take a look back at what we saw in 2013 as it relates to hardware. These devices can be considered the best on offer today as well, and should serve as a precursor to CES 2014, which starts next week.

Samsung Galaxy S4

The natural upgrade from the insanely popular Galaxy S3, the S4 brought some subtle upgrades and needed fixes, but kept the runaway sales numbers of the S3. Though their TouchWiz skin is getting far too bulky (and ugly), the S4 sold at a frantic pace, keeping Samsung atop the Android heap. Helped by a nearly simultaneous worldwide launch and a reported billion marketing blitz, the S4 once again cemented Samsung as an industry leader.

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LG G2

With the Nexus 4, LG showed us they could make a popular, well built handset. Though at the direction of Google, the Nexus 4 served to put LG on the map in a big way. Their G2 was the follow-up for the Optimus G, this time dropping the ostentatious ‘Optimus’ branding. Rather than take the S4 road and bring a slightly bigger screen and feature set, the G2 re-thought the handset altogether.

With the power button and volume rocker on the rear of the device, LG was able to accomplish one thing the tech-obsessed have been wanting: almost invisible bezels. In regard to specs, it brought all it could to the table with an impressive 5.2-inch 1080p display and Snapdragon 800. Their skin is a bit heavy for our liking, but the feature set is really nice. There’s not a lot we didn’t like about this one.

HTC One

This was the first savior devie of 2013 — or at least it was supposed to be. Like Motorola, HTC had been trending downward, effectively losing our interest as their hubris set in and they made ill-advised moves like getting involved with Beats. Upon release, the One was like nothing we’d seen before. Aluminum, sleek, and gorgeous, it still somehow felt dated and heavy. Sense was updated, which helped, but the One just missed something we still can’t put our finger on. Perhaps it was just confusion from all the Zoe and Ultrapixel talk, we’re still not sure. Where HTC failed, Motorola would succeed.

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Chromecast

Perhaps understanding that we’re not going to buy a new TV anyway, Google released the Chromecast. The dongle (perhaps our favorite word for 2013) served as a streaming media device, though it had intrinsic ties to Google rather than content providers. It works with apps rather than an on-screen menu, and is little more than a broadcast device for your mobile media content. Be it locally stored content or via an app like Netflix, Chromecast makes it possible to view your stuff on just about any TV.

Like any successful product, the Chromecast invited a host of also-ran apps and hardware to mimic its functionality. At only , it was hard to not pick one up. Between the price and ease of use, Chromecast really lit up the mobile tech scene in an unexpected way. As more content providers bring the functionality to their apps natively, the want for one will only increase.

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Gaming

Android gaming, like smartwatches (which we’ll get to in a minute), exploded in 2013. NVIDIA set the stage with their absolutely shocking Project Shield at CES, and was followed by the launch of Ouya and Gamestick later in the year. We’re just now getting the MadCatz offering, which could annihilate the rest. So much hardware, there is one crucial aspect that some just aren’t getting.

The successful gaming devices have Play Store support. Those withouth, most notably Ouya, are left to beg the support of developers who are already stretched too thin. In that, their game offerings are not nearly as good as the Shield. The Shield, however, costs three times as much. With Google rumored to bring gaming to the living room in 2014, there will be a lot of activity in Android gaming this year — and a lot of hardware that falls off the map.

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Moto X

Prior to launch, the Moto X was rumored to be made of everything from Unicorn horn to being a working hologram of a phone. We’re clearly joking, but the fervor leading to the launch of the X was palpable. We were curious how the now Google-owned Motorola would stage a comeback, and the Moto X was the device we all thought they’d use to mount that re-entry to prominence.

On launch, the initial reaction was mixed. Some loved its simplicity, others lamented the device being limited to AT&T. The 720p screen confused us, as did the step-back processor. Highly customizable before assembly, the Moto X had no removable battery or microSD card slot. Left wondering what just happened, review units started working their way to us, and we finally understood.

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If anything, the Moto X showed us that software is much more important than hardware at this juncture. The hardware choices for the Moto X were meant to compliment the software, not vice versa. In doing so, Motorola was able to give a significantly better experience with the Moto X, bringing the world of contextual data front and center. Their almost-absent skin on Android was refreshing, and let Android purists have their day. The tweaks and changes were all meant to help you in a day-to-day sense, not bring some oddball camera filter you’ll never use. For our money, the Moto X was the quintessential Android device in 2013.

Moto G

As much as the Moto X taught us about user experience and perceived compromise, the Moto G is set to do the same for the mid-range segment. It packs all the normal punch you’d expect from a true mid-range device, but checks in at about half the price of the competition. If nothing else, the Moto G is set to hit other OEMs where it hurts, and keep our wallets happy. Though light on specs, it brings the same customization feel as the Moto X, but can be manipulated on the fly with removable back plates.

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Honorable mention

LG G Flex

Though Samsung was technically first to the curved device market in 2013, the G Flex was the better offering. With amazing battery life and interesting tweaks, we found it to be both interesting and compelling as a choice for this list. Though LG claims the device wen through several hundred design changes prior to launch, we still think of curved display smartphones more as proofs of concepts that signify those flexible displays we see so much of at trade shows are coming. They’re also keen to bring it to market on a wider scale, which proves they’re serious about this direction.

Note 3 and Galaxy Gear

Sadly, neither impressed, but both made a splash. The Note 3 was a slight bump from the Note 2, but brought with it the Galaxy Gear. Samsung’s first smartwatch was far, far less than desirable, especially considering other contenders like the Sony Smartwatch 2 or next device on our list, the Pebble. While making headlines, neither of these would have been notable as standalone devices, and the Gear only works with a few devices. The Gear has a camera, a first for a smartwatch, but continues to be hobbled with poor support and limited functionality. The creepy marketing efforts only turn us off more.

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Pebble

An eInk screen, slightly clunky design, and limited style options make the Pebble one that can easily be dismissed too quickly. When you look a little harder at the functionality, the Pebble just might be the best smartwatch around. Easily configurable (if you have a little tech know-how) and simple to use, the Pebble perfectly accomplishes what smartwatches currently set out to do: it notifies you. Others have come along with more flash or style (see above), and promise of more to come, but the Pebble remains great at being simple — and works with just about any device. It also trumps the competition in the battery life department, which is good, because plugging a watch in is still weird.

Nexus devices

The Nexus 7 slimmed down and sped up, but we consider it a natural bump from the Nexus 7 2012. Sadly, we lost the Steve McQueen leather-esque backing of the original, and the screen got slimmer and taller, but nothing left us wanting. The slim profile and zippy processor handled everything Android with precision, and the screen is bright and gorgeous. The new Nexus 7 kept the Nexus brand at the top of the 7-inch tablet offerings.

The Nexus 5 was another upgrade we saw coming, even if it was one of the most anticipated devices this year. A screen size bump was welcome, as was the jettisoning of the glass back from the Nexus 4. We wish Google had kept the sloped front glass from the Nexus 4 for this one, but it’s easily the flagship Google needed — and we wanted. It also naturally encourages users to go prepaid and ditch their draconian contracts, which we’re always fans of.

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Conclusion

What 2013 brought us was diversity, with Motorola disrupting the status quo and LG thinking outside of the box in new ways. We saw the birth of wearable tech in a big way, too. We still don’t quite have what we want from smartwatches, but we may never get there, either. If you’re wondering where Google Glass is on this list, don’t. As a product not ready for retail, we purposefully omitted it from the list. We like the concept, but until it sees the light of day for everyone — allegedly in 2014 sometime — we’ll be keen to watch the program from afar. When we can get it somewhere other than eBay, we’ll call it a consumer device.

As we look ahead to 2014, one thing is certain: we’re getting wearables. Google Glass promises to come out at some point in 2014, and there are so many smartwatches we can’t keep them straight. With an explosion in one segment, we can also expect to see some contraction as lesser-than offerings fall off the map. Much like the early days of Android tablets, wearables are coming fast and furious. Like those days of Android tablets, it’s also a good idea to be cautiously optimistic about your potential purchase. After all, you don’t want that device you’re excited about now to end up in one of those “worst products ever” article a few years from now.

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Pressy brings a customizable hardware button to your Android handset

Pressy

So you picked up that shiny, new Android handset and now you find yourself wishing there was an easier, button-based shortcut for getting to your favorite Android functions. Wait a minute… you actually want more buttons on your smartphone? It’s 2013 folks, and less is more (unless it comes to screen size)!

To be fair, sometimes extra physical keys can come in handy, such as a button that allows you to quickly load up your camera. Most of today’s devices are lacking such physical buttons, but that’s where the new Kickstarter project Pressy comes in.

Most Android users are looking to ditch extra buttons, so we have to wonder if there is really a demand for something like Pressy.

Pressy is a tiny button that plugs into your headphone jack, allowing you to easily launch apps and services with the click of a button.

The button works in conjunction with a special Pressy app, and can be customized to do just about anything from launching a camera, to voice recording, opening up settings, launching a specific app or even calling home – the choice is yours.

Pressy isn’t just for one special function either, as it can perform multiple different tasks depending on whether you single-click the button, long click it or even double click.

This sounds pretty cool, but who wants to sacrifice the headphone jack? The good news is that you don’t have to. When you want to plug in a headphone, take out Pressy and put it into an included holder that clips to a keychain. Next, plug in your headphones and the headphone button can fully function as the Pressy key without issue – easy as that.

But is there demand for such a thing?

Most Android users are looking to ditch extra buttons these days, so we have to wonder if there is really a demand for something like Pressy. The answer appears to be a resounding yes, at least judging by the fact that Pressy has already exceeded its k goal with 45 days left to go. At the time of this writing, 3,532 has been pledged towards the project.

If you too are interested in getting your hands on Pressy and its accompanying app, you can head over to their Kickstarter page where a minimum pledge of will land you a basic Pressy.

A word of caution, the team behind Pressy is just getting things off the ground, and so they don’t expect to ship the little-button-that-could until March of next year. Still, good things come to those that (are willing to) wait.

What do you think of Pressy? Is it a great idea, or do you feel that having another hardware button is an unnecessary addition?

Android Authority

B&N giving up on Nook tablets, turning to unnamed hardware partners instead

Nook Tablets

When B&N unveiled that it was adding Google Play support its Nook HD line, we hoped that bringing Google’s store-front to the device would be enough to push the company forward and allow Barnes & Noble to successfully compete against other Android devices, including Amazon’s Kindle Fire tablets.

As it turns out, the solution was more of a quick band-aid to help drive sales and further deplete existing Nook HD stock.

Today B&N announced that amid declining revenues for the Nook division, they are ending in-house production of Nook tablets, though they will continue to manufacture and sell Nook e-readers.

So are Nook tablets dead and over? Not exactly.

The idea is that the company wants to reign in costs and reduce risks. One of the ways they hope to do this is through the creation of a partnership program, where they will turn to other manufacturers to produce their own Nook-branded tablets.

As for existing Nook tablets, B&N plans to continue to support the devices in-store and through updates. Additionally, B&N will sell the Nook HD line at least through the holiday season.

Will a 3rd party model work for Nook tablets?

You have to wonder how interested vendors will be in partnering with B&N on a line that clearly has seen better days. You also have to wonder whether partner devices would still feature B&N’s custom UI, or would merely have the “Nook” branding and come bundled with the Nook app (as well as Google Play).

If the Nook partnership model is only about tapping into the somewhat-limited power of the Nook brand, you can probably count out bigger manufacturers like Acer, Asus, Sony and Samsung from getting involved. One potential suitor that comes to mind is Foxconn, after all the company has clearly shown a desire to branch out and create its own branded hardware. Keep in mind that’s nothing but pure speculation.

Are you surprised that B&N is throwing in the towel when it comes to creating its own tablet hardware? Can B&N find success through co-branded Nook devices?

    




Android Authority

Apple hardware, HTC One, iPhone 5S release rumors, Smartphone addiction

ccc4252a592013 0.jpg Apple hardware, HTC One, iPhone 5S release rumors, Smartphone addiction

Interested in iPhone, iPad, or Apple and looking to have some great conversations? Got a burning question or frustrating problem you just want help fixing? Already an expert and eager to share your knowledge? Well, all that and more is just waiting for you in the iMore forums.

Here are today’s hot topics:

If you already have a Mobile Nations, FaceBook, Twitter, Google or Microsoft Account, simply log in and start posting. Otherwise,  register now, and don’t forget to download our free iMore Forums app for iPhone and iPad!

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New X Phone rumors surface, won’t have customizable hardware; Motorola will reportedly make a Nexus phone this year

Motorola X Phone

There’s been a plethora of rumors concerning the Motorola X Phone this month. Some have claimed that the X Phone will offers customizable hardware and others have claimed that it’s slated for a November launch. And now another rumor coming from Android and Me is giving us more details about the phone.

This is just a rumor, as we can’t confirm any of this. However, the rumor seems to fall in line with some of the previous reports we’ve seen.

Android and Me‘s sources say that the X Phone’s launch date will be in July. It was originally slated for June, but manufacturing issues have caused a delay. The Wall Street Journal reported on this last year, saying that Motorola was facing “manufacturing and supply-chain management” issues.

The X Phone will have an ‘exclusive” launch in July with a broader launch around Thanksgiving, which falls in line with previous November launch rumors. This could indicate a few things. The device could be sold exclusively online for a time or it may not be available in certain markets until the broader launch in November. If a July launch is in mind, we should hear of it at Google I/O in May.

x-phone-prototype-back

According to the source, the X Phone will also be user customizable, which follows up with earlier rumors. However, it does not appear that hardware can be modified aside from internal storage. Instead, users will be able to customize the design of the phone with some personalized software settings. Users will be able to order the device in a large quantity of colors while also being able to modify the material of the outer casing. Buyers will be able to pick from plastic, metal and carbon fiber.

Motorola will also allow buyers to further customize the hardware, but not with the first X Phone release. The company may want the idea to take off before getting into something so ambitious like hardware customization, which makes a lot of sense considering that devices could get very costly very fast.

The source says the X Phone will be a formidable HTC One competitor, but it won’t be a Galaxy S4 or iPhone 6 killer. The X Phone brand will, for the most part, be marketed as a customizable phone that is able to connect up to a multitude of Google products, such as Google Glass and the smartwatch. Motorola seems to have more of a focus with software than hardware with the X Phone, so it would make sense to not have top-of-the-line hardware.

Android and Me‘s source also says that the X Phone will feature a Motorola logo on the back of the device, which will act as a touch sensitive button that allows you to launch various commands. There is a very high possibility that this could be true.

A couple of weeks ago, Google filed an application for a patent that would put back panel touch controls on a smartphone or tablet. What the source describes on the X Phone is nearly identical to the description of the back panel touch controls patent.

Another source told Android and Me that Google’s smartwatch could be made available around the time the X Phone launches, which would also make sense since the X Phone is supposed to have some sort of functionality between the smartwatch, Google Glass and possibly other Google products. It’s possible that the smartwatch could be an accessory to accompany the X Phone.

In addition to the X Phone, Motorola will be launching their own Nexus device at the end of the year. This device will not be apart of the X Phone brand, but it is interesting that Motorola could be making a Nexus device, as previous rumors indicated that LG could be making the next Nexus device.

Finally, the source says that Motorola will release more Droid phones release on Verizon this year, as Google inherited an 18 month line of products when the search giant purchased Motorola Mobility.

The rumor could be entirely fake, as the source wasn’t identified nor can the information may be confirmed. However, if the rumor has any weight to it, we should at the very least, hear Google mention its existence at Google I/O in May this year.

Are you looking forward to the X Phone?

The post New X Phone rumors surface, won’t have customizable hardware; Motorola will reportedly make a Nexus phone this year appeared first on Android Authority.

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