Tag Archives: Retina

Why Apple couldn’t make the iPad mini with a Retina display

The iPad mini doesn’t have a Retina display, and that’s left it and Apple open to a lot of criticism. It’s handy to say the iPad mini should have a Retina display, however regrettably for Apple and for us, it’s not so easy to engineer. It comes at a cost. I’ve mentioned that before in passing , but given the press it’s still getting, over a week over launch, it bears repeating. If you’re not familiar with the term Retina display, it’s the marketing jargon Apple uses to describe HiDPI (high dots-per-inch), or screens that have pixels so small they “disappear”, offering a more enjoyable, more photographic experience. other than the dots that make up the face or text or character you’re looking at, you simply see the face or text or character. Apple achieves Retina display whilst maintaining software compatibility by pixel doubling both horizontal and vertical resolution. 1 pixel at popular density will become divided into 4 pixels at Retina density.
 
The iPhone and iPod contact went from 480×320 at 163ppi to 960×640 at 326 dpi Retina in the summer and fall of 2010. the total sized iPad went from 1024×768 at 132 ppi to 2048×1536 Retina in March of 2012. The last time Apple released a non-Retina iOS device was the iPad 2 in March of 2011 (and that’s the device upon which the iPad mini is based). And, as John Gruber of Daring Fireball points out, there’s a direct parallel between those devices and Retina displays as well:
I don’t see how the non-retina iPad Mini shipping seven months after the retina iPad 3 is any different than the non-retina iPad 2 shipping nine months after the retina iPhone 4 was unveiled.

Why Apple couldn’t make the iPad mini with a Retina display

The iPad mini doesn’t have a Retina display, and that’s left it and Apple open to a whole lot of criticism. It’s easy to claim the iPad mini should have a Retina display, however sadly for Apple and for us, it’s not so effortless to engineer. It comes at a cost.
 
I’ve said that before in passing , but given the press it’s nonetheless getting, over a week over launch, it bears repeating. If you’re not familiar with the time period Retina display, it’s the marketing jargon Apple uses to describe HiDPI (high dots-per-inch), or screens that have pixels so small they “disappear”, providing a more enjoyable, more photographic experience. other than the dots that make up the face or text or character you’re looking at, you simply see the face or text or character. Apple achieves Retina display whilst maintaining software compatibility by pixel doubling both horizontal and vertical resolution. 1 pixel at essential density will become divided into 4 pixels at Retina density.
 
The iPhone and iPod contact went from 480×320 at 163ppi to 960×640 at 326 dpi Retina in the summer and fall of 2010. the full sized iPad went from 1024×768 at 132 ppi to 2048×1536 Retina in March of 2012. The ultimate time Apple released a non-Retina iOS equipment was the iPad 2 in March of 2011 (and that’s the gadget upon which the iPad mini is based). And, as John Gruber of Daring Fireball points out, there’s a direct parallel between those devices and Retina screens as well:
I don’t see how the non-retina iPad Mini shipping seven months after the retina iPad 3 is any different than the non-retina iPad 2 shipping nine months after the retina iPhone 4 was unveiled.

Why Apple couldn’t make the iPad mini with a Retina display

The iPad mini doesn’t have a Retina display, and that’s left it and Apple open to a lot of criticism.
 
It’s simple to say the iPad mini should have a Retina display, but unfortunately for Apple and for us, it’s not so effortless to engineer. It comes at a cost.
 
I’ve mentioned that before in passing , but given the press it’s still getting, over a week over launch, it bears repeating. If you’re not acquainted with the term Retina display, it’s the marketing jargon Apple uses to describe HiDPI (high dots-per-inch), or displays that have pixels so small they “disappear”, providing a more enjoyable, more photographic experience.
 
Instead of the dots that make up the face or text or character you’re looking at, you just see the face or text or character. Apple achieves Retina display screen whilst maintaining software program compatibility by pixel doubling both horizontal and vertical resolution.
 
1 pixel at standard density turns into divided into 4 pixels at Retina density. The iPhone and iPod touch went from 480×320 at 163ppi to 960×640 at 326 dpi Retina in the summer and fall of 2010. The full sized iPad went from 1024×768 at 132 ppi to 2048×1536 Retina in March of 2012. The last time Apple released a non-Retina iOS equipment was the iPad 2 in March of 2011 (and that’s the machine upon which the iPad mini is based). And, as John Gruber of Daring Fireball factors out, there’s a direct parallel between those devices and Retina displays as well:
I don’t see how the non-retina iPad Mini shipping seven months after the retina iPad 3 is any different than the non-retina iPad 2 shipping nine months after the retina iPhone 4 was unveiled.

12-inch Retina MacBook with no fan, new trackpad makes the rumor rounds

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A forum post on Chinese language site Weiphone.com offers up tantalizing details on Apple’s next round of MacBooks. The comments are attributed to an author with a credible track record of breaking leaks and photos for MacBook laptops in the past, according to MacRumors.com.

The poster reports that MacBook Air updates are coming soon, with MacBook Pro updates expected later this year. That’s consistent with what happened last year: Apple updated the MacBook Air at WWDC, but waited until the fall to introduce updated MacBook Pros.

A new 12-inch MacBook is in the works, according to the poster. The computer eschews fans and comes with a new trackpad design that doesn’t include a mechanical button, like the trackpad on current MacBook models. Such a design might enable Apple to built an even slimmer system than it does already, or perhaps use the extra space to cram even more battery capacity inside.

The question is whether this would be another MacBook model to augment the current line or a replacement for an existing product. Looking at Apple’s MacBook line, the 13-inch segment is the most crowded – there’s the 99 13-inch MacBook Air, the 99 13-inch MacBook Pro, and 99 13-inch Retina MacBook Pro.

The 11-inch MacBook Air represents the low end of Apple’s product line, and it certainly has its adherents, although its display sports a somewhat unconventional 16:9 aspect ratio that’s wider than other models. Would a new 12-inch model with a more conventional screen design replace that?

Perhaps, but it’s also worth noting that the standard 13-inch MacBook Pro (sans Retina) is getting quite long in the tooth – it wasn’t refreshed in 2013, and is the only Mac in Apple’s entire product line still saddled with a legacy SuperDrive as standard equipment (it also uses a conventional hard drive, the last Mac laptop to have one).

Months ago analyst Ming-Chi Kuo suggested that Apple’s going to build out the Retina MacBook Pro line with a 12-inch model, too. So it’s really anyone’s guess where this device might fit into the matrix.

The report also mentions an Apple wearable, with the claim that it’s still in the prototype stage, not yet ready for production.

Are you interested in a 12-inch MacBook? What do you think the right price would have to be? Talk to me!

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iPad Air vs Retina iPad mini: The decision!

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iPad Air vs. Retina iPad mini. It seems like that’s all I’m getting asked about these days. We’ve done [#protected_0#] about it we’ve done full-on [#protected_0#] for it, and I’ve done a complete [#protected_0#] and [#protected_0#], and still, the questions. Haven’t. Stopped. Coming. But I’ve used both now, a week exclusively on the Air, a week exclusively on the Retina mini, and a week switching back and forth. So, what’s the answer?

The Retina mini is just much more convenient. It all but disappears into my laptop bag, and if I’m going out and don’t want to take my laptop, the mini fits into my jacket, and even my back jeans pocket. If you’re always on the go, and need just a little more computing than an iPhone enables, the Retina iPad mini simply can’t be beat.

The iPad Air is just much bigger and more expansive. It feels opened up, and even though it’s the same number of pixels, there’s a luxury to having them spread out. I keep it at home, in the living room or bedroom, and I close my MacBook and grab my iPad Air if there’s anything I really want to read or watch. If you don’t have or want a laptop at all, the iPad Air is the ultimate post-PC.

As with the iPad 4 and original mini, having both means I can use the Retina mini when I travel, as a Wi-Fi hotspot, and a way to do stay connected on the road and in the air. And I can use the iPad Air while at home, for reading books and comics, drawing, watching TV and movies, and even VNC.

 iPad Air vs Retina iPad mini: The decision!

When I use the iPad Air, I do miss the lightness of the Retina mini, especially when holding it for long periods of time. But when I use the Retina iPad mini, I miss the size of the Air’s screen. This, I think, is what makes the decision so hard. Some megahertz and color range aside, they two iPads are almost atomically identical in every way but size. The difference comes down to half-full vs. half-empty perspective. You can finally have a full-sized iPad almost as light as the mini, or a mini almost as powerful as the full-sized.

And that’s the key – it’s not that it’s impossible to decide, it’s impossible to go wrong. You’ll be well served by either, simply pick the one that slightly better fits your use-case.

If portability is the most important thing to you, if you’ll have a computer with you most of the time, if you travel a lot, if you want to be able to hold it up for long periods of time, then you want the Retina iPad mini.

If power is the most important thing, if you want to use it as a primary computing appliance, if you mean to use it more around the home, school, or office, if you need to get a ton of work done, then you want the iPad Air.

For me, Infinity Gauntlet to my head, fate of the multiverse at stake, I’d probably choose the iPad Air – between iPhone and iPad Air, it feels like I’d have both extremes covered – but even while typing that I starting to second guess myself…

5fed836d93mf.gif iPad Air vs Retina iPad mini: The decision!

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iPad Air vs. Retina iPad mini vs. iPad 2 vs. iPad mini: Which iPad model should you get?

 iPad Air vs. Retina iPad mini vs. iPad 2 vs. iPad mini: Which iPad model should you get?

2013 iPad buyers guide: How to choose the perfect new iPad Air or Retina iPad mini, or less expensive iPad 2 or iPad mini for you!

Once you’re sure you’re buying an iPad and now, the next step is to decide which iPad you’re going to get. And this year, it’s a tougher decision than ever. The new iPad Air and Retina iPad mini are identical in every way but screen size, 7.9- vs. 9.7-inches the only differentiator. If money is incredibly tight, though the old iPad 2 is a bit cheaper, and the old iPad mini, a cheaper still. No matter which one you choose, however, you’ll be paying hundreds of dollars. Either a few, or a lot. So do you go with big or small, old or new? Which iPad should you get?

Current iPad models and price points

 iPad Air vs. Retina iPad mini vs. iPad 2 vs. iPad mini: Which iPad model should you get?

Apple’s 2013 iPad lineup consists of 4 different models, the iPad Air, Retina iPad mini, iPad 2, and iPad mini. The iPad Air and Retina iPad mini have 16GB, 32GB, 64GB, and 128GB storage options, in either Wi-Fi only, or Wi-Fi and cellular models. The iPad 2 and iPad mini come only with 16GB, but still have Wi-Fi only, or Wi-Fi + cellular models. That makes for a dizzying array of possibilities.

Yes, both the new Retina iPad mini and the old iPad 2 start at 9. Wacky.

 iPad Air vs. Retina iPad mini vs. iPad 2 vs. iPad mini: Which iPad model should you get?

Up-front vs. total cost of ownership

 iPad Air vs. Retina iPad mini vs. iPad 2 vs. iPad mini: Which iPad model should you get?

The original iPad mini starts at 9, making it the cheapest iPad ever. The iPad 2 starts at 9. Both cost less up-front than the new Retina iPad mini, which starts at 9, and the new iPad Air which starts at 9. That can be a considerable difference up front, 0 or 0 at the very least, depending on the exact model and options you choose. That’s real money, in your pocket, for rent, for food, for car payments, for school, or for other important things in your life.

However, if you keep an iPad over the course of a year or two, 0 or 0 isn’t that much spread over the course of that time. In some cases, it’s less than a month, for a much better screen, a much better processor, and more.

If you have absolutely no money to work with, the iPad mini is good tablet and the iPad 2 an okay one. I’d recommend the Retina iPad mini over the same priced iPad 2 every day of the week, but if you absolutely need the bigger screen and that’s all the money you have, that’s what you need and what you have.

If money isn’t your biggest consideration, go for the iPad Air or Retina iPad mini.

Finite vs. future-proof

 iPad Air vs. Retina iPad mini vs. iPad 2 vs. iPad mini: Which iPad model should you get?

Apple is pretty good about supporting older devices. The 2011 iPad 2 is still be sold in stores, after all, and is compatible with iOS 7. However, compatibility comes with compromise. Older generation iPads have older generation hardware. They have lower screen density – standard instead of Retina – and outdated processors – Apple A5 instead of Apple A7. They also don’t come with any storage options over 16GB – not 32GB, and certainly not 128GB.

So, while the iPad 2 and original iPad mini might have gotten iOS 7 this year, and be able to run iOS 7 apps, the odds of them being able to run iOS 8 or iOS 9 in a couple of years isn’t great.

Alternatively, the iPad Air and Retina iPad mini, their awesome Retina displays, beefy 128GB storage options, and monstrous Apple A7 processors should last you for years to come.

Who should get an original iPad mini?

The iPad mini launched in October of 2012, and comes with a Lightning adapter. Aside from that, it’s all old tech. Standard display instead of Retina, and Apple A5 processor instead of Apple A7. The current version does come with Wi-Fi or Wi-Fi + cellular options, but with only 16GB of storage, which isn’t much these days.

If there’s any way for you to save up an additional 0 for the Retina iPad mini, or better still, 0 for the 32GB Retina iPad mini, you’ll have a much, much better experience. Otherwise, if you really want an iPad, and you’ve got 9 earmarked for it and not a penny more – or you’re equipping a school or business by the score – get the iPad mini and enjoy.

Who should get an iPad 2?

The iPad 2 launched in April of 2011. It has no Lightning connector, a standard display instead of Retina, an Apple A5 processor instead of an Apple A7, and while it has Wi-Fi or Wi-Fi and cellular options, it maxes out at 16GB of storage, which can be hard to manage.

You might want to consider a Retina iPad mini for the same 9. If you can save up even 0 more, a 32GB Retina iPad mini is great, and a 16GB iPad Air is also go. For 0 more, you can get a state-of-the-art 32GB iPad Air. Otherwise, if you really want a full-sized iPad, and you’ve got 9 in your pocket and that’s it – or you’re equipping students or employees by the score – get the iPad 2 and enjoy.

Who should get a Retina iPad mini?

The Retina iPad mini comes packed with 7.9-inches of 2048×1536 Retina display and a smoking fast Apple A7 processor. It’s identical in every way but size, weight, and price to the iPad Air. That means choosing between them comes down to 0 and just about 2-inches.

If price is a consideration, the Retina iPad mini is a fantastic tablet, and starts at just 9. If size is a consideration, the Retina iPad mini is better if you want to travel with it, use it as a mobile hotspot, and otherwise value portability the most. (It’ll fit in a back jeans pocket if it has to.) If either of those things are appeal to you, get the Retina iPad mini.

Who should get an iPad Air?

The iPad Air is the current top-of-the-full-size-line iPad. It has a 9.7-inch, 2048×1536 Retina display and screamer of an Apple A7 processor. Aside from size, weight, and price, however, it’s pretty much identical to the Retina iPad mini. So, your choice boils down to an extra 0 for an extra 2-inches.

If money is no object, the iPad Air starts at 9 and is the best big tablet on the market today. If size is something you’re debating, the iPad Air is primed for people who use it around the house, office, or school, and otherwise put productively ahead of portability. (Those extra inches can come in handy.) If any of that resonates with you, get the iPad Air.

Still undecided?

If you’re still having trouble choosing between the iPad mini, iPad 2, Retina iPad mini, or iPad Air, jump into our iPad discussion forums and the best community in mobile will happily help you out.

Bottom line, don’t spend money you don’t have, but don’t skimp if you don’t have to. Your iPad will be one of the most often-used, most important possessions in your life for months and maybe years to come. Get as much iPad as you can reasonably afford, and then enjoy!

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Did you hear the one about the iPhone with the 4x Super Retina display?

 Did you hear the one about the iPhone with the 4x Super Retina display?

There’s a rumor going around that Apple might be considering going to @4x — a “Super Retina” for a future iPhone display. Apple went to @2x, from 320×480 at 163ppi to 640×960 at 326ppi for the iPhone 4 Retina display, and lengthened it to 640×1136 at the same 326ppi for the iPhone 5′s 4-inch widescreen display. These days, however, Android phones are shipping with 1080×1920 (1080p) displays at well over 400ppi.

So, to leap ahead again, and to keep things just as easy on the apps as the last big density increase, in some theoretical universe Apple could just double again to @4X, right?

Well, I did the math on a 5-inch, @4x display back in January and here’s how it works out:

4b5b6d5086sities.jpg Did you hear the one about the iPhone with the 4x Super Retina display?

That’s how the various 5-inch iPhone options look when you compare them both in terms of pixel count (top) and physical scale (bottom), with an iOS standard touch-target grid overlay (44px). From left to right, the iPhone 5 (black), theoretical iPhone @3x (purple), theoretical iPhone @4x (red), theoretical iPhone with iPad display @2x (blue), with the HTC Droid DNA 1080p (green) thrown in for good measure.

Yes, HTC has made 1080p (1920×1080) phones at 440ppi, which while positively pornographic, show what’s already out and on the market. If Apple decides it wants to exceed that the way the original Retina display exceeded other panels at the time, they’d have to skip 3x and go straight to 4x — 2272×1280 at 522ppi.

It would require even more graphics processing power, more LED light, and more battery, and it would be absolutely batshit insane, but hey, we’re considering all options here.

Going to 5-inches @4x probably isn’t something within the current realms of technology, economics, or reason, however.

Going to to @4x with a 4-inch display, to put it just as bluntly, is even more batshit insane. Until humans grow hawk eyes, there’s just no need. If an when Apple goes to 5-inches, maybe @3x will make sense, or maybe a more painful switch to the 1080p standard. Maybe there’s even something in the Apple labs that does 2x Retina in a very different way than what’s being reported right now…

Anyone actually want to see Super Retina display any time soon?

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How to speed up Retina MacBook Pro wake from sleep

b2abd62a87n hero.jpg How to speed up Retina MacBook Pro wake from sleep

Last week while Mark Gurman and I were complaining about those little imperfections that mar the otherwise fantastic Retina MacBook Pro experience, Chad Coleman passed along a tip from Erv Walter on how to make the Retina MacBook Pro wake from sleep faster. This is for those times when you lift the lid, see the password entry field, but can’t actually enter a password for what feels like 10 seconds or so. I mentioned it on MacBreak Weekly on Tuesday, and so many people found it helpful I figured I’d mention it here as well. From Ewal.net:

What is actually happening is that these new MacBook Pro’s (and recent MacBook Air’s) have a new powersaving mode which Apple calls standby. Standby mode kicks in after the laptop has been in normal sleep mode for about an hour. When that happens, the contents of RAM are written to the hard drive and the RAM is powered down to further extend battery life. In theory, the laptop will last up to 30 days in standby mode. The trade off is that, when waking up, it takes a long time to reload 16 GB of RAM from the hard drive (even with SSD).

It’s a battery saving feature that, if you’re plugged in, feels like a bug. If you’re not on the road and you want speed over savings, Walter shows a terminal command that lets you change the standby delay. I’ve been using it all week and it’s been great. I’ll be traveling this week, however, so I’ll be reverting to default. That’s the nice thing about it — you can set it to what makes the most sense for your current work flow.

For more information, and the terminal command you need to use, hit the link below.

Source: Ewal.net

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Second-gen Nexus 7 with high-res display to launch before Retina iPad mini, analyst says

nexus-7-vs-ipad-mini-600px

Budget tablets with high-resolution displays are coming later this year, an analyst estimates, with the second-gen Nexus 7 to beat to market a Retina iPad mini.

DisplaySearch analyst Paul Semenza said that a Nexus 7 2 could arrive with an HD+ resolution display – 1920 x 1200 – that would bump pixel density from 216ppi for the current model up to 323ppi.

Display mass production for the Nexus 7 could start in the second quarter of the year, much earlier than panel production for the Retina iPad mini.

Apple is said to launch the iPad mini in the third or fourth quarter and equip it with a 2048 x 1536 resolution display, like the one found on the iPad 3 and iPad 4, but smaller. Pixel density would double, from 163 on the first-generation iPad mini to 324 on its successor.

Among the potential Retina iPad mini display makers, Semenza lists LG Display, AUO, Japan Display and even Sharp, but he doesn’t mention Nexus 7 2 screen suppliers.

Actual launch dates for either product aren’t provided yet, so we’ll have to wait a while for more availability details on these two new products. At the same time, we’ll remind you that analysts do make mistakes, and we’re yet to see either Google or Apple announce their upcoming tablets, so take everything with a grain of salt for now.

The post Second-gen Nexus 7 with high-res display to launch before Retina iPad mini, analyst says appeared first on Android Authority.

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Zync launches quad-core 9.7-inch Retina display tablet in India

Zync Quad 9.7

Zync Quad 9.7

Indian consumers definitely don’t suffer from a lack of options when it comes to choosing budget-friendly Android tablets, with new releases happening almost every week. So what’s three more? Zync today announced the launch of three new tablets, the Dual 7.0, Quad 8.0, and Quad 9.7, with the last featuring a 9.7″ Retina display!

The naming scheme of the latest lineup of tablets is quite simple, and basically state two specifications of the device, the processor and display size. With that in mind, the Zync Dual 7.0 features a 7-inch 5-point multi-touch capacitive touch display with a 800×480 resolution, a 1.6Ghz dual-core processor, 1GB RAM, 8GB internal storage which is expandable via microSD, a 2MP rear camera and a 0.3MP front camera, a 3,000 mAh battery, and weighs just 313 grams. While the specifications of the Dual 7.0 aren’t anything to write home about, the price point is impressive at just Rs 5,990 (~3).

Zync Dual 7.0

Zync Dual 7.0

Both the Zync Quad 8.0 and Quad 9.7 boast similar specifications, with a 1.5 Ghz quad-core processor, Mali-400 GPU, 2GB RAM, 16GB internal storage expandable via microSD, 5MP rear camera, and 2MP front camera. The Quad 8.0 features an 8-inch 10-point multi-touch capacitive HD IPS display with a 1024×768 resolution and a 5,400 mAh battery. Really stunning is the fact that the Quad 9.7 features a 9.7-inch HD IPS Retina display, that is, with a resolution of 2048×1536. Powering the device will be an 8,000 mAh battery.

The Quad 8.0 will be available for Rs 12,990 (~5), but only Rs 1,000 more will get you the Quad 9.7, at Rs 13,990 (~4), so the latter is definitely the better choice. All three tablets will come with Android 4.1 Jelly Bean out of the box. Granted, these aren’t the first Jelly Bean tablets to be released in the country, but the Quad 9.7 is absolutely amazing considering the price point. Of course, a more hands-on approach will be required to see if the tablet stands up to the lofty expectations set by the specifications.

Zync Quad 8.0

Zync Quad 8.0

You can  buy all three tablets from the online Zync store here (Quad 9.7), here (Quad 8.0), and here (Dual 7.0). While the Dual 7.0 and Quad 8.0 are available for purchase immediately, the Quad 9.7 seems to be out of stock at the moment.

If the real-life performance of these tablets are as good as they seem to be on paper, then Zync may have a winner on their hands, not only to take on other local manufacturers, but also internationally-renowned OEMs like Sony and Samsung. It’ll be very interesting to see how the tablet wars shape up in India!

What are your thoughts? Will you consider buying the Zync Quad 7.0, Quad 8.0, or Quad 9.7? How amazing is it that a budget-friendly Android tablet now features a quad-core processor and a Retina display? Let us know in the comments section below.

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